Transformation on TV


Nathan Baranowski

May 12 2016

ojo have been working with the Disabilities Trust for a number of years. This weekend their work features on Louis Theroux's latest documentary 'A Different Brain'

Louis Theroux: A Different Brain, BBC2 9pm Sunday 15th - May 2016

#ADifferentBrain

It’s not every day you get the chance to share in something truly amazing. For over two years ojo solutions has been working with the Disabilities Trust to deliver a technology transformation programme.

We've been working in the Health and Social Care Sector for over eight years and supporting organisations use technology to make a difference and enable people often excluded from the digital world.

Louis Theroux’s documentary does a great job in showcasing the work of this leading charity; one that most people will never have heard of. Many of us know nothing of the challenges people with brain injuries live with so please tune in to BBC2 on Sunday at 9pm for a fantastically sympathetic insight.

If watching it inspires you, please get in touch if you think you have the skills to contribute to our work with the Disabilities Trust and our technology transformation programme. It really is revolutionary in the truest sense of the word and we’d love to hear from skilled people who want to volunteer their skills to a worthwhile project. Whether you develop, innovate or design, we’re looking for people who want to make a difference.

What’s it all about

“Louis takes a look at the issues that some of the estimated one million people in the UK living with the long-term effects of a brain injury have to deal with

Louis spends time with staff and service users at the Brain Injury Rehabilitation Trust, one of the UK's largest providers of neuro-behavioural rehabilitation, in an effort to understand how individuals and their families come to terms with this life-changing condition.

Often called a 'hidden disability' because those affected can show little physical signs of change, individuals with acquired brain injury face enormous cognitive, behavioural and personality challenges. Those affected are left to reconstruct who they are - from relearning the basics of walking, talking and eating to redeveloping complex personality and behavioral traits, often in the shadow of who they once were. Family members are often caught between grieving for the loved one they have lost and learning to love the person they are now”.

Find out more at http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07c6fjk

 

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